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  • $10,000,000 Malpractice Verdict
  • $8,000,000 Car Crash Verdict
  • $5,500,000 Malpractice Verdict
  • $5,200,000 Malpractice Verdict
  • $3,800,000 Malpractice Settlement
  • $3,250,000 Malpractice Settlement
  • $2,500,000 Surgical Error Verdict
  • $2,100,000 Product Defect Settlement
  • $1,300,000 Truck Crash Settlement
  • $1,100,000 Surgical Error Settlement

The saying is “accidents happen.” They do. But sometimes people are seriously hurt because of a fall that is someone else’s responsibility.  When this happens, the result if often a personal injury claim.

Despite safety innovations and a growing awareness of liability among property owners, “slip and fall” injuries are unlikely to disappear anytime soon. There are many misconceptions about these kinds of injuries and their value in Maryland courts.  While they can result in lucrative verdicts or settlements, it’s important to know the facts.

Say you’re walking through a parking lot and an uneven sewer grate sends you flying face first to the asphalt. Or you’re shopping for groceries and a puddle of water from a leaking freezer makes you lose balance and shatter your hip.  What do you do?  Do you have any options to bring a claim against the wrongdoer who caused you to fall?   The post is intended to better help you understand the answers to these questions.

A Cesarean section, commonly called a “C-section”, is often performed when the baby or the mother is in distress. A C-section enables a doctor to remove the infant immediately in order to prevent an injury and then allows the doctor to provide treatment as soon as possible. Sometimes, however, there may be a delay in performing a needed c-section.

The standard of care when delivering a baby requires the obstetrician or midwife to correctly assess the fetal monitor tracings and to recognize any non-reassuring patterns. If the baby is in trouble, doctors need to take action quickly. A timely performed C-section is often the best path to protecting the child from a loss of oxygen that can lead to a brain injury or death.

There is some debate among obstetricians as to when a C-section is appropriate.  There is no dispute that the standard of care calls for cesarean sections in many cases, including, repeat C-sections,  multiple births, a labor and delivery which is expected to be challenging, when the child’s expected size is disproportionate to the mother’s pelvis, uterine tumor obstructions, or breech or transverse presentation of the neonate. Obstetricians also agree that there are cases of fetal distress or maternal disorders that mandate a C-section.

Meconium is the baby’s first bowel movement. It is probably not what you expect. These first feces consists of debris and cells from the intestinal tract and mucus and slimy fluids. Meconium is green and has no smell.

What is Meconium Aspiration Syndrome?

Meconium Aspiration Syndrome (MAS) causes respiratory distress as a result of meconium entering the respiratory tract below the vocal cords and presenting in the tracheal bronchial tree. When the baby makes an attempt to breathe in utero, before the baby is delivered, the baby can inhale meconium material into the lungs. The fear is the meconium blocking the airways.  Oxygen is critical to life for all of us.  But, during the birthing process, it is critical to have a smooth flow of oxygen to the brain and other vital organs.

Insurance companies do not think the way you and I think. But, by understanding how insurance adjusters think and what is important to them, you can maximize how much money you receive in a personal injury case.

What Is the Adjuster’s Goal?

Insurance adjusters are trained to try to rip you off. Although, adjusters do not call it that. They also do not think of it in those terms. But, they are not charged with the task of making a reasonable settlement offer to you. An insurance adjuster’s mission is to pay you as little money as possible to settle your claim, which allows the insurance company to keep as much of its money as it can.

Any discussion of how much money a medical malpractice case in Maryland is worth begins with our cap on non-economic damages in malpractice.  The pain and suffering cap for 2018 in Maryland medical negligence cases is $800,000.  This same $800,000 cap applies to wrongful death cases where there is only one surviving family member.  If there are two or more surviving family members, then the non-economic damage cap rises to $1 million.

What Maryland’s Damage Cap Means and Does Not Mean

Does Maryland’s medical malpractice cap mean that you cannot get more than $800,000 or $1 million as the maximum possible recovery in a medical malpractice case?  No.  What it does mean is that this is the cap limit on non-economic damages.

If you have suffered a serious ear injury as the result of the negligence of someone else, you want to know the potential settlement value of our case.  The purpose of this page is to improve your understanding of the range of potential value of your claim.  We also have information elsewhere on the settlement value of hearing loss cases.

The ear is a complicated instrument, responsible for a variety of different functions in the body. Injuries that affect the outer, middle, or inner ear could result in vastly different symptoms, such as hearing loss, dizziness, or increased sensitivity to sound. In cases that involve an ear injury, it’s important to get specific.

There is no one-size-fits-all estimation for the value of an ear injury claim, so we have to take the symptoms, type of injury, severity, available treatments, recovery potential, and mechanism of injury into consideration for each and every individual case. With that in mind, this article will explore the different types of ear injuries that could arise from an auto accident or another traumatic event, and provide examples of trial verdicts and settlements for cases involving ear injuries. In addition to the type and severity of the ear damage, these sample cases will give you a sense of how claim value can also vary based on jurisdiction, the severity of any additional injuries, and a multitude of other factors.

Hypoxic-Ischemic perinatal encephalopathy (“HIE” for short) is loss of oxygen to the brain.  In slightly less than half of the cases, HIE can cause death or brain injuries.

What Causes HIE?

Obviously, the brain is the key to neurological function.  The brain commands and controls all of our essential actions and reactions.  This includes sending messages via neurotransmitters to control all of a person’s essential cognitive and physical functions.

The trucking business is a dog-eat-dog world.

Shippers want to get their products moved as cheaply as possible.  Smaller trucking companies are often the best choice to keep cost down.  Smaller trucking companies.  They have low overhead and simpler systems. Many trucking companies — usually smaller trucking companies — have less systemic checks and balances.  And they cut corners — safety corners — like crazy to keep costs down.

As a result of all of this, truck accidents happen.  Too many plaintiffs’ truck accident lawyers leave millions on the table because they do not explore potential claims against the brokers and shippers.

cross-examinationThe most important part of a personal injury trial is the plaintiff’s testimony.  Specifically, the most critical part of a trial is the personal injury plaintiff’s direct examination.  If it doesn’t go well when you are in total control of the process and the facts, it will be nearly impossible to get a favorable damages award. We believe in thoroughly preparing the plaintiff to testify, both on direct and cross-examination.  I would not be surprised to learn that our firm spends more time on direct examination preparation that any firm in Maryland.

Witness preparation is a broad term that covers any communication between a lawyer and a prospective witness done to get the most favorable possible substance or presentation of trial testimony.  It also helps the lawyer know precisely what the witness is going to say on direct examination.

By the time the trial draws near, most experienced personal injury lawyers will have a pretty good idea of what’s out there as far as potential cross-examination material. This comes from a variety of sources: interrogatory answers, medical records, deposition testimony, prior medical history, etc.  But you really do not know what someone is going to say until the tell you what they are going to say.  And, as experienced trial lawyers know, even then you are still not entirely sure what will come out of the witness’ mouth.

social-medi-300x256You know what’s funny about stuff you post on the internet? It’s public, and that means people can see it. This includes those you would rather not see it. For example, if you are a disability claimant, you may want to forego that chance to post a video on Youtube of yourself half-naked, covered in tin foil, breakdancing to “Magic Carpet Ride.” Once somebody sees it, you could have a problem with your total disability claim.

This is also very important for people who are making a personal injury claim. Nowadays just about everybody has some form of social media account, and just about all of them give the user the ability to post pictures or video. As a personal injury lawyer, increasingly I am seeing defense attorneys checking my clients out on the web, including social media accounts. Defense attorneys also seek access to these accounts in discovery. I always object to producing social media login information, and so far I have not yet had anyone take the issue before a judge.  Even posts without pictures that describe what you are doing or how you are feeling can be easily taken out of context.

But I do advise all of my clients that they should stay off social media entirely while they have a pending claim.  If that’s not possible, they should careful to never post anything that is even arguably inconsistent with the claim they are making- even to the extent of not posting a picture of yourself at a wedding, or outdoors smiling. It is very easy for that to be taken out of context.

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