Articles Posted in Personal Injury

If you have suffered a serious ear injury because of the negligence of someone else, you want to know the potential settlement amount of our case.  The purpose of this page is to help you better understand the range of potential settlement compensation payouts in your claim.

Ear Injuries

Age-related macular degeneration is the most common cause of vision loss in the U.S. It happens when the macula region in the eyes deteriorates as we age.

Recent studies have shown that some cases of macular degeneration may actually be caused by prolonged use of the prescription drug Elmiron for bladder conditions. Approximately 350 Elmiron lawsuits have been filed in the MDL class action seeking damages for eye injuries.

Macular Degeneration

As the number of paraquat lawsuits continues to grow, a motion was filed last month asking the Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation (JPML) to create a new Paraquat MDL class action for the consolidated handling of all future Paraquat cases in federal courts.

This motion is a very clear indication that the Paraquat lawsuits are building steam and could develop into a new large-scale mass tort.

Studies Link Paraquat Exposure to Parkinson’s Disease

Our lawyers are getting an increased number of calls for Elmiron lawsuit in the last few weeks.  This class action is growing quickly.  I think these have the potential to be extremely big cases with large settlement payouts. If you have a claim, you want to call an attorney sooner rather than later to protect your rights.

Our firm is currently accepting new Elmiron vision loss lawsuits. Call us today for a free case evaluation at 800-552-8082.

September 2021 Update:

You are injured, intentionally or unintentionally, by the actions of a minor.  The question is, can you file a lawsuit against that minor in Maryland?

The legal concept of “minority” is something that we all understand on a basic level. Children or “minors” (anyone under the age of 18) don’t have the same legal standing or capacity as adults. The underlying reason for this is simple: children don’t have the maturity and mental competence as an adult so we don’t hold them to the same level of accountability.

But what happens if you get seriously injured by the negligent or intentional actions of a minor? What if a 16-year-old driver runs a red light and puts you in a wheelchair for life? Can you sue a minor for negligence and get financial compensation? What if a 9th grader runs over a little old lady on his skateboard and breaks her hip? Does the little old lady have any legal recourse?

Our lawyers spend a lot of time trying to make our community a better place and we do pro bono work helping victims.  For us, this often involves helping clients whose cases we cannot take. We do things like fighting for children to help them get the help they need from the school system or assisting victims who are trying to manage the damages from their car accident case.  We spend hundreds of hours a year on this type of pro bono work for the community.

One question we occasionally get from prospective clients is whether we accept personal injury cases on a pro bono basis. The answer to this question is no.  If you google “pro bono personal injury lawyer Baltimore”, the response you get is crickets.

People are sometimes surprised to hear that.  It is not that personal injury and malpractice lawyers don’t care about helping people in need. I know we care very much about that. Fighting for the “little guy” is the underlying theme of our law practice. We love to go out and battle with big insurance companies to get financial compensation for our hard-working clients.

Defendants Just For Men® hair care products and dyes are sold at hundreds of local and national retailers, including Wal-Mart, Target, Walgreens, and CVS. Just for Men pitchmen like Keith Hernandez argue “Go from Grey to Great” but some are finding an unpleasant catch to the inexpensive hair and beard dye. Specifically, customers are complaining of painful reactions after using the product to clean up their patches of grey.

Just for Men’s manufacturer, Combe Incorporated, hasn’t issued a recall of their hair dye products and most negative reactions to the products are usually temporary. But for many middle-aged men hoping to hold onto that youthful look a little longer, Just for Men’s potential for skin irritation and other issues may do more to harm than help.

Consumer Complaints Old and New

The saying is “accidents happen.” They do. But sometimes people are seriously hurt because of a fall that is someone else’s responsibility.  When this happens, the result is often a personal injury claim.

Despite safety innovations and a growing awareness of liability among property owners, “slip and fall” injuries are unlikely to disappear anytime soon. There are many misconceptions about these kinds of injuries and their value in Maryland courts.  While they can result in lucrative verdicts or settlements, it’s important to know the facts.

Say you’re walking through a parking lot and an uneven sewer grate sends you flying face first onto the asphalt. Or you’re shopping for groceries and a puddle of water from a leaking freezer makes you lose balance and shatter your hip.  What do you do?  Do you have any options to bring a claim against the wrongdoer who caused you to fall?   The post is intended to better help you understand the answers to these questions.

I just reached a settlement in a case that was set for trial next week. Obviously that is great news for my client, who now has some closure on a difficult period in his life. But memorializing the agreement and having the clerk remove the case from the docket doesn’t mean the end of my job when it comes to settlement.

I had subpoenaed three witnesses to appear for trial: an independent “bystander” witness, a traffic engineer from the State Highway Administration, and a police officer. I made sure to contact each of these witnesses as soon as the case resolved to let them know they would not need to appear. They really appreciated that I let them know. The traffic engineer in particular made it a point to let me know how often attorneys subpoena witnesses from his office and then do not let them know when the case settles. Then they travel to court for nothing.

I can’t believe that. It’s just unprofessional, and arguably violates Md. Rule 2-510(h), which states that “[a] party or an attorney responsible for the issuance and service of a subpoena shall take reasonable steps to avoid imposing undue burden or cost on a person subject to the subpoena.” As far as I’m concerned, not telling a witness under subpoena that the case settled and they don’t have to appear causes the witness “undue burden or cost.”